Technical Papers

3D Printing

Thursday, 25 July 2:00 PM - 3:30 PM
Session Chair: Bernd Bickel, Disney Research Zürich

Spec2Fab: A Reducer-Tuner Model for Translating Specifications to 3D Prints

It is often more natural to specify 3D models in terms of their physical or functional properties. This paper proposes an abstraction mechanism that simplifies design, development, implementation, and reuse of algorithms that translate object properties into material-specific representation that can be directly fabricated.

Desai Chen
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

David Levin
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Pitchaya Sitthi-Amorn
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Piotr Didyk
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Wojciech Matusik
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

OpenFab: A Programmable Pipeline for Multi-Material Fabrication

OpenFab is a programmable pipeline for synthesis of multi-material 3D printed objects that is inspired by RenderMan and modern GPU pipelines. It supports procedural evaluation of geometric detail and material composition, using shader-like fablets. It is implemented in a streaming fashion within a fixed memory-usage target.

Kiril Vidimce
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Szu-Po Wang
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Jonathan Ragan-Kelley
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Wojciech Matusik
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Worst-Case Structural Analysis

As 3D printing becomes increasingly accessible, wider groups of users are able to design and manufacture custom products. This paper proposes a novel technique for detecting structural weakness for 3D printing. The technique does not require specification of loads common in structural analysis and can discover worst-case loading scenarios automatically.

Qingnan Zhou
New York University

Julian Panetta
New York University

Denis Zorin
New York University

InfraStructs: Fabricating Information Inside Physical Objects for Imaging in the Terahertz Region

InfraStructs are material-based tags that embed information inside digitally fabricated objects for imaging in the Terahertz region. Terahertz imaging can safely penetrate many common materials, opening up new possibilities for encoding hidden information as part of the fabrication process.

Karl Willis
Carnegie Mellon University

Andrew Wilson
Microsoft Research