Technical Papers

Computational Light Capture

Monday, 22 July 3:45 PM - 5:35 PM
Session Chair: Kari Pulli, NVIDIA Research

Femto-Photography - Capturing and Visualizing the Propagation of Light

An ultrafast imaging technique to overcome the challenges of capturing and visualizing light in motion. The challenges include: impractical SNR of picosecond exposure times, limited FOV of the one-dimensional sensor, comprehensible visualization of light scattering, and undistorting intriguing space-time warps.

Andreas Velten
MIT Media Lab

Di Wu
MIT Media Lab

Adrian Jarabo
Universidad de Zaragoza

Belen Masia
Universidad de Zaragoza, MIT Media Lab

Christopher Barsi
MIT Media Lab

Chinmaya Joshi
MIT Media Lab

Everett Lawson
MIT Media Lab

Moungi Bawendi
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Diego Gutierrez
Universidad de Zaragoza

Ramesh Raskar
MIT Media Lab

Low-Budget Transient Imaging Using Photonic Mixer Devices

Commercial time-of-flight sensors based on photonic mixer devices (PDMs), are used to capture transient images of photons in-flight. Through the use of readily available components, the setup is orders of magnitude less expensive than previous approaches, while simultaneously simplifying and speeding up the capture process.

Felix Heide
The University of British Columbia

Matthias Hullin
The University of British Columbia

James Gregson
The University of British Columbia

Wolfgang Heidrich
The University of British Columbia

High-Quality Computational Imaging Through Simple Lenses

This work seeks to replace complex, commercial optics by uncompensated, simple optics and proposes a post‐capture image‐processing method that removes the optical aberrations that result from using such simple optics.

Felix Heide
The University of British Columbia

Mushfiqur Rouf
The University of British Columbia

Matthias Hullin
The University of British Columbia

Björn Labitzke
University of Siegen

Wolfgang Heidrich
The University of British Columbia

Compressive Light-Field Photography Using Overcomplete Dictionaries and Optimized Projections

This paper explores compressive light-field photography and evaluates optical and computational design parameters. Three key insights are discussed: light-field atoms sparsely represent natural light fields, optical designs can be optimized for capturing 2D light-field projections, and robust sparse reconstruction methods allow for single-shot light-field recovery.

Kshitij Marwah
MIT Media Lab

Gordon Wetzstein
MIT Media Lab

Yosuke Bando
Toshiba Corporation, MIT Media Lab

Ramesh Raskar
MIT Media Lab

A Reconfigurable Camera Add-On for High-Dynamic-Range, Multi-Spectral, Polarization, and Light-Field Imaging

An optical design for a camera add-on that can be configured to enable acquisition of different plenoptic dimensions without permanently changing the camera.

Alkhazur Manakov
Universität des Saarlandes, Max-Planck-Institut für Informatik

John Restrepo
Universität des Saarlandes

Oliver Klehm
Max-Planck-Institut für Informatik

Ramon Hegedus
Max-Planck-Institut für Informatik

Elmar Eisemann
TU Delft

Hans-Peter Seidel
Max-Planck-Institut für Informatik

Ivo Ihrke
Universität des Saarlandes, Max-Planck-Institut für Informatik