Technical Papers

Sounds & Solids

Wednesday, 24 July 3:45 PM - 5:35 PM
Session Chair: Paul Kry, McGill University

Wave‐Based Sound Propagation in Large Open Scenes Using an Equivalent-Source Formulation

A novel technique that accurately models realistic acoustic effects such as diffraction, scattering, focusing, and echoes in large, open scenes at real‐time rates.

Ravish Mehra
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Nikunj Raghuvanshi
Microsoft Research

Lakulish Antani
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Anish Chandak
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Sean Curtis
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Dinesh Manocha
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Example‐Guided Physically Based Modal Sound Synthesis

A physically based sound synthesis framework that takes one example recording and automatically determines the material parameters for modal synthesis, capturing the inherent material quality of the recording. Automatically adding sound effects to virtual environment applications is simplified!

Zhimin Ren
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Hengchin Yeh
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Ming C. Lin
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Eulerian‐on‐Lagrangian Simulation

A Eulerian‐on‐Lagrangian solid simulator that leverages a mixed formulation to alleviate many of the shortcomings of purely Eulerian and purely Lagrangian simulation methods.

Ye Fan
The University of British Columbia

Joshua Litven
The University of British Columbia

David Levin
The University of British Columbia

Dinesh Pai
The University of British Columbia

Radial View Based Culling for Continuous Self-Collision Detection of Skeletal Models

A radial-view-based culling method in conjunction with skeletons for continuous self-collision detection, aiming at the closed triangular mesh that represents the surface of a model.

Sai-Keung Wong
National Chiao Tung University

Wen-Chieh Lin
National Chiao Tung University

Chun-Hung Hung
National Chiao Tung University

Yi-Jheng Huang
National Chiao Tung University

Lii Shing-Yeu
National Chiao Tung University

Real-Time Dynamic Fracture With Volumetric Approximate Convex Decompositions

A new method to simulate the destruction of large and complex objects. Instead of static pre-fracturing typically used in games, the method applies user-defined fracture patterns dynamically, allowing impact-dependent destruction into an unlimited number of pieces, fast enough to be used in games.

Matthias Müller-Fischer
NVIDIA Corporation

Nuttapong Chentanez
NVIDIA Corporation

Tae-Yong Kim
NVIDIA Corporation